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Head position – swimming drills to improve front crawl

Navigation and sighting

There are many swimming drills to improve front crawl, but one thing that is of great importance is the head position. And this quote is something that I think is very good to have in mind when talking about this subject.


6 steps to becoming a faster and more efficient swimmer

We have chosen to sort the freestyle stroke into six separate segments. In all featured articles, you will both be able to read about that part of the stroke and watch our videos on different swim drills that will improve your skillset in that area.

  • The Catch – The part of your stroke from when your hand enters the water, up until you are able to start pulling yourself forward.
  • The Pull – This part starts where the catch ends, and continues until the hand exits the water.
  • The Recovery – It is the part of the stroke that occurs above the surface.
  • The Kick – Kicking in swimming is not the biggest power output, but, it is crucial for water position and reducing frontal drag.
  • The Rotation – The way you rock your body from side to side to create your optimal streamlined position and best power output.
  • The Head position – How you hold your head, and where you look will greatly impact your position in the water.

Doing drills from these six areas will improve your swimming. 



“Where the head goes the body follows”

Ryan Holiday

Drills to improve front crawl

Whether you are a pool swimmer, or an open water swimmer. It doesn’t matter. When you are swimming, look straight down. Looking forward, even if it’s only a little bit will make two things happen. The first is that your head will be closer to the surface, and create more frontal drag since there are more of your head that breaks the surface. The second being that you’ll create a curve when extending your spine. That will result in pain in your lower back.

So, even though many of you reading this are open water swimmers, who will navigate from time to time, get your head back to a neutral position between sightings and breathing. (Do you get chafing from the wetsuit around your neck? Often this comes from a “roll” between sighting and rotation to breathe).

Polo-swimming ss a great way of understanding the importance of the head position (among other things).

Head position while swimming

How to:
Try to start swimming with your head lifted and eyes forward.
Then lower your head and look down.
Feel the difference in drag.

Focus on:
Head, hips, and heels in line and close to the surface.

Good for:
Body position.
Balance.
Efficiency.

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Swimming training tips – Analyze your swimming

Swimming training tips

Swimming sometimes gets a bad rep in the world of endurance sports. Adventure racers call themselves triathletes that can’t swim. Many triathletes call the sport survive-bike-run. But does it have to be this way?

Of course not.

Swimming can be (if you’re asking me, it surely is) a really fun sport. part of that is because of its complex nature.

One thing that is really beneficial when swimming is hiring a coach that can look at your swim technique and give feedback on your efficiency doing it. Sadly, swim coaches don’t grow on trees (or in lily ponds), and having limited time due to work and family life, it can be hard to book a session.

So, what can you do by yourself?

The water is your friend… You don’t have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move

Alexandr popov

How to do a swim analysis

The first step is to film yourself swimming. Ideally, you do it together with a friend. We have two reasons for that,
1. Your friend can follow you with the camera, filming you from the side.
2. It is more fun to do things together.
If you do it yourself, don’t worry. Just see to it that you get enough material from a static film of you swimming.

The making of

So, filming doesn’t have to be Oscar quality. smartphones goes a long way! The angles you need are:

  • From the front, with you swimming towards the camera.
  • From the side, with you swimming past the camera.
  • If possible: Film underwater, swimming towards the camera.

Now you have lots of great material. But what to do with it? What is it that you are looking for?

Most times, swimming is not a one solution fixes all type of thing. You often have to work on many aspects of your swimming. But focusing on many different things at the same time will do you no good. So we will break down the analysis into smaller pieces. And then you can work on them one by one. So print this list, and use it to analyze. Then read our blogs for swimming training tips.

8 steps to improve your swimming

Breathing

  • Bilateral or unilateral – Are you breathing to one side or both?
  • Breathing in / breathing out – Do your breaths have a continuous flow? You should never hold your breath, think of it as jogging.
  • Movement – Breathe in while you have one arm stretched out in front of you. The in-breath should be done when your recovering arm is in line with your eyes.
  • Eyes above the surface – Focus on having just one of your eyes above the surface.

Head position

  • Where are your eyes fixed? – Do you look forward or do you look straight down while swimming?
  • Line in the water – Where the head goes, the body follows. Keep a straight and neutral neck.

Read more and watch video here.

Body position

  • Horizontal – Are you horizontal in the water, or are your legs sinking?
  • Hips and kick – Do your kick initiate at the hip? Or, do you kick at the knee joint?
  • Head, hip, and heel – The three “H’s” should be in line with each other.

Rotation

  • How many degrees – How many degrees do you rotate while swimming?
  • What initiates the rotation – What part of your body initiates the rotation?
  • What part of the body rotates – Do you rotate as a solid piece, or is there a difference between bodyparts?

Read more and watch videos here.

Kick

  • The horizontal distance between feet – How far apart horizontally does your feet go?
  • The vertical distance between feet – How far apart vertically do your feet go?
  • Effect/power – The kick Usually stands for 5-10% of your propulsion forward. Is it “cost-effective” to have a strong kick?
  • Rythm – Do you flutter-kick, is it a two-kick? What’s the rhythm?

Read more and watch videos here.

Stroke – Underwater

  • Where you put your hand into the water – Do you enter the water close to your head, or stretched out?
  • Catch – Where does your catch start, in your fingertips, wrist or further up your arm?
  • Pull – What does your arm movement look like during the pull? do you use your forearm as well as your hand?
  • Effect – Do you lose momentum anywhere along your stroke?

Read more and watch videos here.

Stroke – Recovery

  • Relaxed or tense – Are you relaxed or stiff during your recovery?
  • Hands position – Is your hand relaxed, and where is it relative to your body?
  • Elbow – What leads your recovery? Your elbow should pass your shoulder before your hand.
  • Speed – The recovery is the only part of your stroke not generating any propulsion, therefore it should be swift.

Read more and watch videos here.

All at once

And finally, put it all together!?

Or, take help from our swim coaches, who have many years of experience in both coaching and being active in racing. They have all the swim training tips and tricks that can benefit you greatly!

Swimming training tips

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Rock’n’roll – swim drills to improve rotation

Using pull buoy to work on swim technique

When talking about rotation in swimming, we are talking about the swimmer’s ability to rotate around your own mid axis. The rotation will greatly help you to utilize your mobility and putting yourself in as strong a position as possible

When rotating, your neck should be relaxed and neutral. So that you are always looking down towards the bottom of the pool.

This will help you be more streamlined and thus, create less frontal drag.


6 steps to becoming a faster and more efficient swimmer

We have chosen to sort the freestyle stroke into six separate segments. In all featured articles, you will both be able to read about that part of the stroke and watch our videos on different swim drills that will improve your skillset in that area.

  • The Catch – The part of your stroke from when your hand enters the water, up until you are able to start pulling yourself forward.
  • The Pull – This part starts where the catch ends, and continues until the hand exits the water.
  • The Recovery – It is the part of the stroke that occurs above the surface.
  • The Kick – Kicking in swimming is not the biggest power output, but, it is crucial for water position and reducing frontal drag.
  • The Rotation – The way you rock your body from side to side to create your optimal streamlined position and best power output.
  • The Head position – How you hold your head, and where you look will greatly impact your position in the water.

Doing drills from these six areas will improve your swimming.


Improve your rotation with these swim drills

Rotating while swimming is a way to utilize your mobility to gain strength and travel further per stroke. Thus being more efficient.

Swimming with a pull buoy

How to:
Using a pull buoy is a great way to learn how to rotate your body as a whole.
Place the pull buoy between your legs, and gently squeeze

Focus on:
Rotate your body as one unit.
Your rotation drives from the hips and core, not your shoulders.

Good for:
Focus on your stroke.
Body rotation.
Letting your legs rest.

6-3-6 drill

How to:
Starting on your side with one arm forward, the other resting along your side.
Do six kicks on the side, on the sixth kick:
Roll over to do three strokes, on the third stroke, roll over to your side:
Do six kicks.
Repeat.

Focus on:
Driving your body rotation from the hip.
Do a quick roll from side to side.

Good for:
Body rotation.
Kicking efficiency.
Body control.

Rotation timing

How to:
Put on one of your fins and one of your paddles. Have them diagonally.
Swim freestyle as you would without gear on.
Get a feel for the timing of the kick and the catch.

Focus on:
Finding the timing of your hand and kick.

Good for:
Timing.
Connection.
Understanding how your body moves through the water.

Demont

How to:
Start your freestyle stroke with both your arms alongside your body.
Start your next stroke when your arms have completed a “reverse catch up”.
Don’t be afraid to use your rotation.

Focus on:
Rotation, feeling how your body rotates around your centerline.
Be fast in your recovery, so do not stop yourself before the next stroke.

Good for:
Rotation.
A feel for how your body moves forward in the water.

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The recovery phase – swim drills for endurance

The recovery in swimming should be relaxed

The recovery is the part of your stroke that starts when your hand exits the water and ends when your hand re-enters the water. During this phase, you should, well. Recover. That said, you should be relaxed from your shoulder all the way down to your fingertips.

The often forgotten part of your stroke

Nothing you do above the surface of the water will propel you forward. And since that’s the case. You want that part of your stroke to be quick and not create excessive drag.


6 steps to becoming a faster and more efficient swimmer

We have chosen to sort the freestyle stroke into six separate segments. In all featured articles, you will both be able to read about that part of the stroke and watch our videos on different swim drills that will improve your skillset in that area.

  • The Catch – The part of your stroke from when your hand enters the water, up until you are able to start pulling yourself forward.
  • The Pull – This part starts where the catch ends, and continues until the hand exits the water.
  • The Recovery – It is the part of the stroke that occurs above the surface.
  • The Kick – Kicking in swimming is not the biggest power output, but, it is crucial for water position and reducing frontal drag.
  • The Rotation – The way you rock your body from side to side to create your optimal streamlined position and best power output.
  • The Head position – How you hold your head, and where you look will greatly impact your position in the water.

Doing drills from these six areas will improve your swimming.


An easy way to stay relaxed throughout your arm is to think about having a relaxed wrist.

Here are five fantastic drills for creating a great recovery!

Even though these drills look a lot like each other, they differ slightly in their technical difficulties.

Finger drag

How to:
During the recovery of the stroke, drag your fingertips along the surface of the water.
Lead the recovery with your elbow, not your hand.

Focus on:
Feeling that you are dragging your hand on the surface, use your body rotation to get more mobility.

Good for:
A smooth stroke.
Relaxed recovery.
Shoulder mobility.

Zipper

How to:
Imagine that you have a zipper that runs along your whole side of your body.
Imagine closing that zipper during your recovery.

Focus on:
Keep your core tight, and don’t lose balance. Initiate your rotation at the hip, not the shoulder.

Good for:
Efficient recovery.
Body rotation.
Balance.

Thumb in armpit

How to:
During your recovery, when your elbow and hand are in line at your armpit. Put your thumb gently into your armpit before continuing forward.

Focus on:
Rotation will make it easier to place your thumb in your armpit. That body rotation is what we are after. Elbow leads the hand.

Good for:
Relaxed recovery.
Balance.
Shoulder mobility.

Three touch

How to:
During your recovery, take the time to give your bum, shoulder and head a light tap.
Don’t stress it, take your time between every touch.

Focus on:
Being relaxed and don’t tense up during the movement of your arm. That will lead to you losing balance.

Good for:
Getting a relaxed recovery, which gives you smoother and more effortless swimming.

Draw the pig

This is a fun drill that Mikael Rosén taught me at one of his sessions. It is a great drill for working on among other things: balance and mobility.

How to:
During the recovery, stop at the middle and point straight up to the sky or ceiling.
Draw a little pig, and don’t start going forward with your hand before the pig is done.

Focus on:
Think about being tall in the water, and keeping your balance, while you are rotated when drawing the pig.

Good for:
Body balance and streamline.
Mobility in the shoulders.
Relaxing the arms.

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Do you need to kick? Swim drills to improve kick

Kicking in freestyle

Even though the kick only stands for a very small percentage of your propulsion forward. An effective kick will make you more streamlined and that will create less frontal drag. Swimming is quantified by the swimmer’s power output (the force created to pull yourself forward), and the resistance created by the water in front of the swimmer (the force in which the swimmer needs to push against).


6 steps to becoming a faster and more efficient swimmer

We have chosen to sort the freestyle stroke into six separate segments. In all featured articles, you will both be able to read about that part of the stroke and watch our videos on different swim drills that will improve your skillset in that area.

  • The Catch – The part of your stroke from when your hand enters the water, up until you are able to start pulling yourself forward.
  • The Pull – This part starts where the catch ends, and continues until the hand exits the water.
  • The Recovery – It is the part of the stroke that occurs above the surface.
  • The Kick – Kicking in swimming is not the biggest power output, but, it is crucial for water position and reducing frontal drag.
  • The Rotation – The way you rock your body from side to side to create your optimal streamlined position and best power output.
  • The Head position – How you hold your head, and where you look will greatly impact your position in the water.

Doing drills from these six areas will improve your swimming.


So, even if you are not a sprinter in the swimming sense of the word (doing up to 400 in the pool), working on your kick will benefit you greatly.

Four kick-ass swim drills to improve your kick

Try implementing some kicking during your warm-up at your next session.

Kickboard swim drill

How to:
Hold the kickboard in front of you.
Hold your head just above the water, looking forward.
Try having your hip close to the surface.

Focus on:
Kick from the hip.
Active core, don’t let your lower back arc.

Good for:
Developing your kick.
Hip strength.
Building your endurance.

Swimming with fins

How to:
When using fins (or kicking in general), kick from your hip.
Don’t overreach, do your normal short rapid kick.

Focus on:
Focus on using your big muscles around your hip.
Having a tight core.

Good for:
Building endurance.
Building swim strength.
Speed work.

Kicking on your back

How to:
Arms forward, and chin down.
Streamline position.

Focus on:
Kicking from the hips.
Hips close to the surface.

Good for:
Building strength.
Building endurance.
Sense of speed.

Kicking on your side

How to:
Laying on your side, with one arm forward. Look down towards the bottom.
Kick as normal.
Don’t lose balance and tip over to your stomach or back.

Focus on:
Big toes pointing towards each other.
Laying on your side.
Kick fro the hip.

Good for:
Sense of rotation while kicking.
Relaxed spine while swimming.
Strengthening your kick.

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Swim drills to improve speed – The pull

Swimmer showing a drill

When the catch phase is done, you are in the pull phase of your stroke. This is where you take all that good torque and utilize it to gain speed, pulling yourself forward in the water. So, its time to improve your pull with these swim drills to improve speed.

In our earlier blog-post about the catch – We covered stacking of your joints. And this will now come into effect. Starting from the catch we will now focus on how your hand and arm travel through the water.


6 steps to becoming a faster and more efficient swimmer

We have chosen to sort the freestyle stroke into six separate segments. In all featured articles, you will both be able to read about that part of the stroke. Watch our videos on different swim drills that will improve your skillset in that area.

  • The Catch – The part of your stroke from when your hand enters the water, up until you are able to start pulling yourself forward.
  • The Pull – This part starts where the catch ends, and continues until the hand exits the water.
  • The Recovery – It is the part of the stroke that occurs above the surface.
  • The Kick – Kicking in swimming is not the biggest power output, but, it is crucial for water position and reducing frontal drag.
  • The Rotation – The way you rock your body from side to side to create your optimal streamlined position and best power output.
  • The Head position – How you hold your head, and where you look will greatly impact your position in the water.

Starting with the flexion in the elbow, bending your arm between 90 and 120 degrees, so that your forearm points downwards to the pool floor. Then starting the pull in your shoulder joint. Focus on that your hand shouldn’t pass your shoulder on the inside of your body. Pull yourself forward, like you are climbing a ladder. Ending the pull phase of your stroke by doing a triceps extension to push yourself the last bit of the stroke.

Doing drills from these six areas will improve your swimming. 


Three drills that will improve your pull

These three drills are great for working on your pull during your stroke. Try them out during your next swim!

Swimming with paddles

How to:
Paddles are used to build strength and endurance.
Swim as you normally do, feel the paddle against the palm of your hand.
Paddles come in different sizes, start out small!

Focus on:
Paddles will exaggerate everything in your stroke. Good or bad. So focus on technique!
Try to use the paddle as an extension of your forearm, not your hand.

Good for:
Getting a good feel for pulling yourself forward.
Swimming strength.
Swimming endurance.

Upside down paddles

How to:
Place your paddle holding it in your palm with the tip of the paddle resting on your forearm.
Swim with the paddle tight in your hand.
Feel the paddle press against your forearm during the swim. That way you are doing it right.

Focus on:
Keeping a constant force during the full length of the stroke.

Good for:
Using your whole forearm as a paddle in pulling, and not just your hand.

3-2-1 drill

How to:
With your passive arm forward, do three strokes with your right arm, then with your left arm. After that, take two strokes with each arm and last take one stroke with each arm.
Breath on the last stroke of each cycle.
Moderate kicking.

Focus on:
Getting a good long body position and working on your timing, so you don’t over or under glide.

Good for:
Not breathing, you can focus on your stroke.
Timing of the catch and pull.
Getting more distance per stroke.

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6 steps to master swim training drills

Picture showing swimming technique

It doesn’t matter if your name is John Doe or Ryan Lochte. Swim drills are an essential part of swim training. 

No matter how many hours you have put into the pool, there is always something to work on. And that is great, being fully thaught sounds awful. Right? 

In this series, you can look at some of our favorite swim training drills, and how to do them properly. 

6 steps to becoming a better swimmer:

We have chosen to sort the freestyle stroke into six separate segments. In all featured articles, you will both be able to read about that part of the stroke and watch our videos on different swim drills that will improve your skillset in that area.’

  • The Catch – The part of your stroke from when your hand enters the water, up until you are able to start pulling yourself forward.
  • The Pull – This part starts where the catch ends, and continues until the hand exits the water.
  • The Recovery – It is the part of the stroke that occurs above the surface.
  • The Kick – Kicking in swimming is not the biggest power output, but, it is crucial for water position and reducing frontal drag.
  • The Rotation – The way you rock your body from side to side to create your optimal streamlined position and best power output.
  • The Head position – How you hold your head, and where you look will greatly impact your position in the water.

Doing drills from these six areas will improve your swimming. 


Willing is not enough. We must do.

Bruce lee

Analyze your stroke

With all this said, if you want to become a better swimmer? You have two things on your agenda, the first is to swim. The other is to analyze your weak spots and adjust. 

Read, watch our films and analyze your own swimming. Then do!

If you want to get a head start, we suggest you sign up for our online video analysis!

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The best swim drills to improve the catch

The catch is the first part of the stroke

The catch is the initiation of your pull. This is where you “catch the water”, and start to pull yourself forward. In this article, we are going to talk about swim drills to improve your catch. But first, a couple of words describing what we are talking about when we are talking about the catch.


6 steps to becoming a faster and more efficient swimmer

We have chosen to sort the freestyle stroke into six separate segments. In all featured articles, you will both be able to read about that part of the stroke and watch our videos on different swim drills that will improve your skillset in that area.

  • The Catch – The part of your stroke from when your hand enters the water, up until you are able to start pulling yourself forward.
  • The Pull – This part starts where the catch ends, and continues until the hand exits the water.
  • The Recovery – It is the part of the stroke that occurs above the surface.
  • The Kick – Kicking in swimming is not the biggest power output, but, it is crucial for water position and reducing frontal drag.
  • The Rotation – The way you rock your body from side to side to create your optimal streamlined position and best power output.
  • The Head position – How you hold your head, and where you look will greatly impact your position in the water.

Doing drills from these six areas will improve your swimming. 


The initiation of the catch

Start by bending your wrist, pointing your fingertips slightly downward. Palmar flexion of the wrist will start your arm movement towards a high elbow catch since you will “stack” your joints on top of each other. i.e fingertips under the wrist, wrist under elbow and elbow beneath your shoulder. 

Three great drills to improve your catch!

Here are three swim drills you can do to improve your entry and catch. Mix them into your warm-up, or do 4*25 meters in the middle of your set. I personally like to do drills in the middle, when I’m a bit tired. That gives me a good feel for when I do it right.

Catch up

How to:
Place your arms in front of you, with your hands shoulder-width apart.
Do one stroke and recovery, while your other arm is leading you, resting forward.
Don’t exaggerate the kick.

Focus on:
Your elbow should be as close to the surface as possible (within your range of motion). Don’t let it sink towards the bottom.

Good for:
Your direction.
Shoulder strength.
Timing of your stroke.
Get a feel for the catch.

Throwing net

How to:
Imagine that you are holding a fishing net in your hand that you shall throw in front of you.
Accelerate throughout the recovery, so that you and it explosive.

Focus on:
Having your strength coming from your back and extending throughout the recovery. Your strength comes from our big muscles in your torso, and the acceleration of the arm will give it more power.

Good for:
A more powerful stroke.
Entering with speed and directly commit to the catch.

Splash drill

This drill is great to practice if you are playing water polo, but since you are on this channel. I’m guessing you are more of a swimmer. Then it is also a good drill, both for the fun of it. But also for getting a feel for your hand entry.

How to:
When your hand is entering the water, turn your palm facing forward instead of back towards you.
The rest of the stroke should be carried out as normal.

Focus on:
Keeping your palm facing forward.

Good for:
Getting a good feeling for where to enter the water.
Shoulder mobility and strength.
Splashing your buddies!

Learn more about swimming

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Triathlon vs swimrun – The wetsuits

triathlon vs swimrun wetsuit

Wetsuits are a science all by them selfs. What difference is there between different wetsuit, and can you wear a triathlon wetsuit for a swimrun or a swimrun wetsuit for an open water swimming race? In this article, we try to explain the differences and walk through the neoprene jungle.

What is a swimrun wetsuit?

Swimrun wetsuits have the zipper on the front end of the suit, and sometimes they have two zippers – one in front and one in the back for easy dressing/undressing. It is also nicer to have zipped down in front during running, both for cooling down and the breathing. 

Legs are cut above the knees, and the material at the hip is often very thin and soft to enhance the running. Arms on the wetsuit can be long or short, or even detachable. To each their own.  These suits are designed not only for swimming but running in them as well. Therefore, they are not solely optimized for swimming. They often have pockets where you can carry your mandatory equipment.

What is a triathlon wetsuit?

Wetsuits used in triathlons are the same as wetsuits for open water swimming. There are multiple types of suits depending on what type of swimmer you are, more or less buoyancy and mobility depending on the model and your needs. Rules stipulate that a wetsuit used in a triathlon or open water swimming can’t be thicker than five millimeters.

Triathlon vs swimrun wetsuits

So what is the difference between a triathlon vs swimrun wetsuit? In triathlon, there are rules regarding the thickness of the materials used, and the suit can not be thicker than five millimeters giving the swimmer an unfair advantage due to the buoyancy. Since there is no governing body in the swimrun world. Suits can be designed with float panels as thick as you like. Ranging from no extra float aid to maxed out suits with 8 millimeters of neoprene. 

Can I use one wetsuit for both sports?

Can I use my swimrun wetsuit if I want to participate in a triathlon? Sadly, there is not a yes or no answer to this question. Instead, you have to look at your swimrun wetsuit. There are rules regarding some aspects of a wetsuit used in a triathlon. The first is: Is your swimrun wetsuit thicker than five millimeters? If so, it is not allowed. Triathlon wetsuits can’t be thicker than five millimeters. Today, most swimrun wetsuits are thinner than that, but there are still models that cater to the swimmer who likes more buoyancy in their wetsuit. 

I personally have seen people use swimrun wetsuits at races without being disqualified, and if you are not competing for the podium, and instead are in it for the fun of racing. The race marshalls won’t say anything. But to be on the safe side, call the race organization beforehand and check if they are ok with it. I bet that they are more keen on seeing you on the starting line and having a great experience than turning you down because of your wetsuit.

Are you interested in training for a triathlon or swimrun race? Fill out the form below!

  • Background

  • In case we need to contact you for follow up questions.
  • Training

  • Enter the date you think you are ready to start with structured training.
    Date Format: YYYY dash MM dash DD
  • A rule of thumb: Sprint (6-10h), Olympic (8-12h), Ironman 70.3 (8-14h), Ironman (10-14h)
  • Racing

  • If you have not yet decided, enter an approximate date.
    Date Format: YYYY dash MM dash DD
  • Other

Read more on our blog

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Mandatory equipment for swimming

Mandatory equipment for swimrun

Mandatory equipment for swimming? Almost all races have mandatory equipment for the swim section. And here are some of the usual things to bring. Be sure to read the race information beforehand. 

Do you want to be sure that you have everything you need for your big race? Download the equipment for swimrun – checklist and/or the Triathlon race day checklist

There are differences between sport. In swimrun for example, you will need more equipment due to safety. Since you and your racing partner need to be able to help yourself and each other waiting for aid to arrive. In triathlon, you are seldom far from safety boats or land. Here we take a look at the equipment that usually is part of the mandatory equipment for races.

Mandatory equipment

First aid kit

  • The first aid kit consists of a pressure bandage and adhesive dressing (as a minimum). There are swimrun marketed options if you don’t buy that kind. Take some time to waterproof your first aid kit. If the situation calls for its use. Be prepared! 

Whistle

  • Calling for help can be difficult at sea or when in pain in the woods. It is easier to blow a whistle to get attention. Therefore it is crucial to have it within reach at all times. 

Compass

  • Compass for swimrun. Some races have it as a piece of mandatory equipment (the ÖtillÖ World Championship for one). Some modern sports watches carry a compass function. But check with the race director or athlete contact before you arrive if that is an option. 

Wetsuit

  • Covered in a separate post.  

Swim cap

  • Supplied by the race organization, must be worn during all swims. If you need to wear an extra swim cap or neoprene headband, wear it underneath.  

In triathlon, however, there is less equipment that is mandatory and more regulations around the actual equipment that is allowed. But, there is still some equipment that you will need. And that is that you wear your swim cap for the whole swim, and recommended is the use of a wetsuit. The wetsuit is as said not mandatory but recommended by the race organizations. Wear it between 15,9 degrees Celsius and 22 degrees in ITU races, and up to 24,5 degrees celsius in Ironman races

In swimming races, the mandatory equipment is at a bare minimum. Use the swim cap supplied by the race organization. And often, it is not written, but mandatory because of decency is a swimsuit covering your privates.  

Read more about endurance sports